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Tag Archives: overweight

Body scoring: how to check your pet’s weight

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Body condition scoring is a useful method to determine whether your dog, cat or rabbit is at a healthy weight. This can be especially useful at this time of year; the indulgences of the festive season can affect our pets just like us. But being underweight is unhealthy too. Here, vet Brian Faulkner takes us through the 3 simple steps of body scoring your four-legged friend.

There isn’t a single ideal weight for pets. Greyhounds are slimmer than St Bernards, while Siamese cats tend to be thinner than large breeds like the Bengal.

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What to do if your dog is overweight

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Do you have a chubby Collie? Is your Puli looking a little roly-poly? You’re not alone: canine obesity is a common problem. Vet Marc Abraham explains the tell-tale signs of an overweight dog and offers some tips getting your pet in shape

You’ve probably heard about the ‘obesity crisis’ in Britain, but you may not be aware that it is as much of a problem among our canine population as it is in humans.

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Is your pet a porker? Here’s what to do

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We all love to spoil our pets, but a treat too many can cause the pounds to creep on – and even put their health at risk. Here’s vet Alison Logan’s advice on what to do.

It’s often said that owners look like their pets – and this can extend to the waistline, too. Since qualifying as a vet 19 years ago, I’ve seen an increasing number of overweight pets coming through my consulting room. Indeed, the 2007 Petplan census found that 30 per cent of dogs, cats and rabbits are obese, and it’s fast becoming a problem with small furries and pet birds, too.

We are told that ˜’we are what we eat’, but we’re also the result of what we do – and don’t do. Our body is like a seesaw: energy input from the food we eat should be balanced by energy output. If we eat more than our body needs, then the excess energy is stored as fat and bodyweight increases.

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